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  • s 10:21 AM on 130218 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , edit, ,   

    CS6 subtitling 

    POST : Then you could use the “Closed Captioning” function of Premiere to show the files in Premiere.

    If You need to burnin subtitles take a look at: PT ImportSubtitles for Afeter Effects. You can render SRT-Subtitles with the AE Text Tools in AF and then send a Dynamic Link to your Premiere timeline…

     
  • s 7:27 PM on 130217 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , edit, ,   

    CS6 Premiere Crop on Export 

    http://whoismatt.com/cinemascopetutorial/

    When exporting for streaming or viewing on a computer such a YouTube, Vimeo, etc. you will want to click the “eye” on the “croplines” track and make it invisible.  Then you will go to File>Export Media and create a custom render setting using h.264 at 1920×817.  This will just result in a squished video if you do not set the export to crop the video file as well.

    Under the “source” tab in the top, left click the crop button and change it to “Top: 132, Bottom: 131″ – leave the Left and Right at 0.  This will crop your video in the same way as using the croplines did but will result in it being an exact fit.  For some reason if you leave the croplines on your videos on vimeo, it will have extremely small black bars visible on the top and bottom if you do not do this.  Theoretically you could just do this and not bother with using the “croplines” PSD file as a track in your editing but then you would miss out on it as a guideline to help you figure out what is visible in your shots.

    DVD and Blu-Ray: For DVD and Blu-Ray, export as you would normally with the croplines visible.  Whatever resolution you export at, the croplines will be visible and work to create a 2:35:1 aspect ratio for your footage.  Note: In some cases when burning DVDs, specifically with Adobe Encore, I have run into an issue where the footage would overflow the edges of the croplines, creating a weird effect where the viewer could tell that the croplines were just a layer in the footage.  To fix this, when I am editing and planning on rendering specifically to DVD, I select the “croplines” track in Premiere Pro after importing it into the sequence, and select “motion>scale” and change the scale from “100.0″ to “101.0.”  This prevents this footage overflow effect where it is visible at the edges of the croplines.

    online-export-156x300

     
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