Lenses : Cine vs Still

zoom

– : http://matthewduclos.wordpress.com/2011/10/07/why-cinema-lenses-cost-so-much/

Basically, everything boils down to two categories; usability and image quality. Obviously there are other factors involved such as production quantity, but that is usually tied into image quality.  Again, the question is, why is a cinema lens so much more expensive than a still photo lens? Cinema lens prices increase exponentially as the quality increases. For this demonstration, the top of the price spectrum will be represented by the Angenieux 24-290mm Optimo, and the bottom will be represented by the Nikon 18-55mm kit lens. Some would expect a few test shots with some text overlaid on them similar to that of most online lens reviews (mine included), but this really doesn’t show much beyond very basic image quality. To be honest, with todays manufacturing processes and techniques, the overall image quality in the center portion of each example lens, would probably be fairly similar. That doesn’t mean that the next big feature film is going to go out and shoot on a Nikon 18-55mm, but it also doesn’t mean that an 18-55mm Nikon isn’t going to produce good results. This is where the usability of each lens comes into play. For example, the entire core, focus, zoom, lock rings, and housing of the 24-290mm Optimo are machined from billet aluminum. The only part of the Optimo that isn’t made of high quality aluminum is the mount… Because that is made of stainless steel. Comparatively, the Nikon 18-55mm does in fact have an aluminum core, but everything else is plastic and brass, which can be good. It keeps weight and production cost down to a minimum, but is devastating to mechanical accuracy and precision. It doesn’t mean that the Optimo is the better lens for every situation. I wouldn’t want to lug a 25 lb. lens around Disneyland to snap pics of the family with Mickey Mouse. This leads me to the fine details such as stability and accuracy. Cinema lenses are not auto focus and traditionally require a trained focus puller to nail focus in any given shot. This isn’t done by peering through the viewfinder or pressing a button. It’s accomplished by taping out the distance to the subject and then dialing in the measured distance on the lens’ focus scale, which means those marks better be accurate or someone is losing their job. Focus mark accuracy isn’t really a concern on still photo lenses since 99% of users simply depress the shutter button half way and let the cameras auto focus do the work. The other 1% of users who focus manually for still photography, usually look through the viewfinder, pick a subject and adjust the focus ring until it looks sharp, still no need for focus mark accuracy. Nobody sets up their SLR, tapes out the distance, adjusts the lens to that distance and snaps away. It’s just to realistic.

Speaking of focus, image shift and breathing are two more features that are critical in motion picture lenses, but not so much in still photo lenses. Let’s take our 18-55mm Nikon lens, put it on a camera, look through the monitor and rack focus or zoom. The whole image jumps around and loses focus because the components used inside the lens are very light-duty and left very loose to allow the tiny little drive motors to auto focus the lens for you. Comparatively, our 24-290mm Optimo is built with solid aluminum components that are precisely fitted and adjusted to keep everything as tight as possible. This keeps everything extremely smooth and accurate. If you adjust focus or zoom, the image should stay dead center and solid. This kind of performance requires extremely tight tolerances during machining and a very high level of care during assembly. Focusing with just about any still photo zoom lens will create a “breathing” effect that is simply an optical design characteristic. There is no adjustment for this flaw within the lens. It’s part of the optical-mechanical design and is taken into consideration during the development of a lens. Breathing is a bad thing in cinema because it really pulls the audience out of the scene. It changes the field of view of the lens and appears as though the lens is zooming in and out during even a small focus pull. This is why cinema lenses are designed not to breath and add substantially to the cost in order to do so. Tracking is somewhat related to breathing as it can really ruin ascot if not calibrate. Tracking is the movement of the image relative the the sensor/film, while zooming. Ideally, zoomed all the way in, an object in the very center of the image should stay in the exact same position on the sensor/film throughout the entire zoom range. Most cinema lenses include internal adjustment to calibrate tracking while still photo lenses aren’t concerned since you can simply re-compose before each shot.

Another common characteristic of still photo zooms is their speed, or maximum aperture. Take our 18-55mm Nikon for example, again… The maximum aperture is f/3.5 which isn’t too bad. But as soon as you start to zoom, it looses light and stops all the way down to an f/5.6. Modern SLR cameras can easily compensate for this with automatic adjustments to exposure with the shutter speed or ISO. The 24-290mm is comparatively very fast at T2.8 and maintains its maximum aperture throughout it’s entire zoom range. Mostly because it’s an annoyance to think about adjusting setting from shot to shot and trying to match everything, but also because it would look horrible if the aperture started to close down in the middle of a shot, ruining the lighting, look and feel of a scene. Okay, there are plenty of still photo lenses that maintain a constant aperture. In fact, most of the major pro lenses will do this easily. But these are usually a fairly short zoom range. Do the numbers… Take the 14-24mm Nikkor, a great lens with a constant f/2.8 aperture, the zoom range is only 1.7x. The 24-70mm, a 2.9x. And the 70-200mm, a 2.8x zoom. Those three lenses are Nikons current crop of pro zoom lenses. The Angenieux 24-290mm maintains the same constant T2.8 aperture throughout it’s 12x zoom range. That’s almost unheard of in still photo lenses. These couple of characteristics can be lumped into the optical quality of the lens but also effect the usability. Another usability concern for motion picture lenses is their durability. Granted, if a cinema lens is dropped, it’s almost certain that it’s thrown completely out of whack and would require re-calibration, they are built like tanks. The same can not be said for our little 18-55mm Nikon friend. However, there are a lot of modern still photo lenses that are built to endure relentless usage and can really take a beating. All of these details are very minor on paper. It’s when you really get into the nitty gritty and use the lenses on a daily basis that you realize the differences can be substantial. Kind of like looking at two different cameras on paper. Each camera has a 3″ LCD screen, shutter speed, aperture, and ISO adjustments, an SD card slot, compact and portable, and includes a strap! One is a Leica, the other is a Kodak. Both are great cameras, but they are clearly meant for different purposes and clearly have a cost difference. The same logic applies to still photo lenses and cinema lenses. I like to think of it this way: Still photography offers a moment of interest. Cinema demands sustained attention.

0 : http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/1104890

Compared to stills lenses, cine lenses:
have much more rugged mechanics, with thicker barrel walls, etc. Reliability is more important, and low weight less important, than for stills lenses. Greater mechanical stability is also needed for mounting accessories on the lenses.
have standardised housing dimensions as far as reasonably possible. This allows accessories such as matte boxes and lens motors to fit all lenses in the range, and means the lenses within a range are easier to work with, since the position of the focus and iris gear is the same across all lenses.
have toothed rings for attaching motors or other focusing and iris-control devices. On many modern cine lenses, these rings don’t move when the lens is focused.
are made so that the image remains perfectly still when the focus ring is rotated, with no tilt, rotation, or shift from mechanical play.
have stepless iris controls for smooth adjustments while filming.
have more iris blades, for a rounder aperture when stopped down.
have a much longer focus-ring rotation, with distance marks (witness marks) calibrated for each lens, and many more witness marks than stills lenses. This means you can measure the distance to a subject with a tape measure, and then focus precisely by scale for that distance. The distance marks are sometimes placed on interchangeable (or reversible) rings, with metric or imperial units (rather than both). So if the focus puller prefers to work in metres, he or she won’t be confused by irrelevant feet markings, and vice-versa.
have larger and brighter markings (sometimes fluorescent) for better legibility on dim sets.
have more precise colour matching across the lens range.
are often faster, e.g. the Master Primes are T1.3.
sometimes have less breathing. Really high-end lenses, like Master Primes, have practically no breathing (they were introduced with t-shirts saying “Breathless!” to make this point). The Master Primes achieve this with a dual floating-element design: the lens zooms while focusing to compensate for breathing. Mechanically, this is achieved with the use of machined cams rather than helicoid threads, which has another advantage: less variation in focus resistance in hot and cold temperatures.
have typically less distortion, again to a greater extent at higher price brackets.
have less vignetting at low f-stops.
have greater resistance to flare, principally by sacrificing compactness while adding large stray-light baffles inside the barrel (and other light traps). Greater efforts are also made to eliminate the formation of ghost images, by adjusting the curvature and placement of the lens elements at the design stage. Obviously this has the knock-on effect of making aberration correction more difficult, which increases the design effort and manufacturing cost because the aberrations must nonetheless be corrected to a very high level.
have service-friendly features such as easy-to-change front and rear elements, interchangeable mounts, back-focus adjustment features, etc.

1 : http://matthewduclos.wordpress.com/2010/04/29/still-vs-cine-lenses/

One might assume that a lens is a lens and you can simply adapt any lens to suit ones needs. This is usually a matter of changing or adapting the mount just so the square peg fits in the square hole. The fact is that still lenses and chine lenses are very different and can’t always be interchangeable. Still lenses are defined (in my opinion) as lenses that were designed and built for use with an SLR still camera whereas a cine lens would be one designed and built for use on a motion picture (movie) camera. I’ll go over why the two aren’t interchangeable and what can be done to reduce the differences between the two. Modern still lenses are designed for two things… Speed and ease of use.

Nikon 85mm f/1.4 modified with focus gear for a follow focus and an 80mm front for common motion picture accessories. This particular lens also had its manual aperture de-clicked for smooth, seamless rotation.

Manufacturers are always looking for a way to make the auto focus faster and simpler and over the past several decades this has been accomplished by making the focus components lighter and looser in order to make actuations easier for the tiny motors found in the lens or camera. The often plastic mechanics move in very loose, dry, and all together sloppy methods. The same can go for the zoom mechanics in a still zoom lens. This isn’t an attempt to make it easy for a motor, but just a fact of mass production at low cost. This isn’t a bad thing for a photographer taking still photos since the camera focuses nice and quick and then stops all adjustments when the photo is snapped at a fraction of a second. Another issue is that many new still lenses are abandoning manual aperture control rings for several reasons. The camera can control the aperture with no problem and it makes manufacturing cheaper. Lastly, still lenses continue to use focus distance marks, for the most part. But still lenses aren’t calibrated very well and the marks are often just a general guess rather than a reliable reference. Again, not a big deal if you are just depressing the shutter half-way to activate autofocus that doesn’t care what the distance is.All of these “issues” are only issues if you attempt to use still lenses to record motion. With the loose, easy mechanics, the image rendered by the lens on the film plane will jump around and jiggle if you try to adjust focus or zoom while recording. Nothing takes you out of a piece of art more than a jolt of motion similar to that of my moms video tapes of my school parade from 1990. Then there is the zoom. If you try to zoom or out while recording, forget it. Because still lenses aren’t calibrated and don’t hold focus, your picture will go from tac sharp to mush in a few millimeters. The lack of an aperture ring can be neglected since it’s still adjustable in the camera, but not always adjustable while recording. And even when a nice camera allows aperture adjustment while recording, you’re looking at adjustments in half or third stop increments that will simulate the exposure compensation that my phone exhibits.. Not pretty. There are a few other snags with still lenses that can be circumvented. The difference in standards is small, but detrimental. Still lenses don’t utilize external gears for use with a follow focus. Many people have turned to aftermarket add-on gears that simulate a focus or zoom gear. These can be garbage… Some of them use a block or clamp that interrupts the rotation and limits the user to a certain range.

The closest alternative… Zeiss 85mm f/1.4 ZF, a prime lens that come so close to being a cine prime. With a solid aluminum housing and metal components it’s a great compromise.

That just about sums up a majority of the modern still lenses for motion use but alas, there are a few remaining still lenses that are fairly well suited for motion. The first that comes to mind is the Zeiss ZF series lenses. They are completely manual lenses that feature a nice, solid metal construction that eliminates the common image shift and focus loss. And then there are older manual lenses from back when auto-focus was just a myth. But those are hard to find in good condition. That’s about as close you can get to a chine lens with a still lens. The major aspects that make chine lenses more expensive and higher quality are things like build faulty and materials. The tolerances used for designing and making a chine lens are much tighter than a still lens. The components in a chine lens are almost always metals and alloys. The mechanical designs have become extremely complex to avoid the dreaded image shift and to maintain proper calibration even with the severe abuse of modern Hollywood users. For example, a chine zoom will be a para-focal lens (maintains focus throughout zoom range) whereas still lenses can be vari-focal since you just refocus and snap the photo. This is important with a cine lens because the distances referenced on the focus scale are critical to the cinematographer and/or focus puller. These marks must be dead on every time or someone is going to have a heck of a time doing their job.

A true motion picture lens, a Zeiss 85mm Ultra Prime T1.7 provides all the features one would need for shooting motion picture material. With a proper PL mount and superb design it stands tall against still lenses. However, its price tag stands out almost as much as its quality.

2 : http://www.dvxuser.com/V6/content.php?103-Why-We-Need-Cinema-Lenses

Color MatchingMany variables exist that effect the way a lens reproduces color. These variations are usually slight in nature, but important all the same. It is a well known fact that photography lenses are not designed to be color matched. Why would they? Color matching is another perfect example of why cinema and photography lens designs differ based upon how they are used. A photographer works with single independent images. A photograph is taken with one lens, it does not matter if other lenses in the photographers kit have unique characteristics. However, the cinematographer works with multiple shots woven and juxtaposed together to create an illusion of continuous time. When cutting between a medium-close up and an extreme close up, one can’t have the medium shot look neutral-cool and the close-up suddenly have a warm/pink tone. The inconsistency will either consciously or subconsciously weaken the illusion and possibly awake the viewer to the fact they are watching a contrived work of fiction. Cohesion of the image is incredibly important and the illusion must live on. Of course a modern day digital intermediate color-correction session can fix just about any lens color rendering inconsistency. Unfortunately such a process takes time and money. If one were to shoot an entire feature with mismatched lenses, there would be two choices: either release the film with bad color timing, or spend the money and effort to fix it in post. Color timing sessions can be well over hundreds per hour. There is enough work to be done in post. Matching lenses in post color correction when they could have simply been matched on set, is the last thing a production needs to spend money on.

Chromatic Aberration
Chromatic Aberration, also called CA, is the optical occurrence when a lens fails to bend all wavelengths if light equally. Light is made of many different wavelength frequencies that create the colors we see. A lens must capture incoming light then bend and straighten it to fall upon the film/digital sensor plane as straight as possible. When the optical elements within a lens bends the light, they can consequently act as a very mild prism and separate some wavelengths from others. These offset wavelengths will fall just slightly off from their counterparts resulting in a color fringing in the image. This is why aberration is a thin line of color. The color can change depending on which frequency the elements offset. As discussed above in the vignetting section, wide angle lenses have very extreme field of views. These lenses must take incoming light from very radical angles of incidence (thus more radical angles of refraction), and bend them toward the film plane without allowing any wavelengths to be slightly offset creating CA. Thus, chromatic aberrations are often found on the edges of wide angle lens frames.

Front DiameterCinema lenses are often used in tandem with a mattebox system. Unlike photography lenses, which use screw on filters and built in lens hoods, cinema lenses use a mattebox to keep extraneous light from flaring the lens and to hold filters in front of the lens. By using a mattebox, a lens can be changed much faster without having to remove and reattach filters. However, when using a mattebox, it is extremely important to keep light from entering the mattebox from behind, thus either a bellows ring, doughnut ring, or clip-on back must fit perfectly around the lens front. By having a lens set with matched front diameters, the previously listed devices need not be switched out for different sizes, thus the lens change needs no additional actions. This saves time and reduces the amount of support gear needed.

Weight
Although rare and extremely difficult, some select cinema lens sets have many focal lengths with similar or the same weight. Usually these are lenses in the typical range of lengths, as very wide or telephoto lenses have lens designs which often make them heavier in nature. Having similarly weighted lenses can help when the camera is on steadi-cam, a remote servo-head, in handheld mode, or any other delicate mounting operation when balancing the camera is very important.

Focus/Iris Ring Placement and Gears
Cinema lenses are designed to have geared focus and iris rings placed at the same point on the barrel for all focal lengths. Doing so saves the camera assistant time when changing a lens, as the follow focus module nor any FIZ motors will require being adjusted after every lens change, thus further saving time on every lens change. Additionally, photography lenses typically do not have geared focus or iris rings. They are textured as to provide a nice grip for the photographers hand, but are not geared as cinema lenses are. Geared focus and iris rings are a must if to be used with a professional follow focus or remote follow focus system.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-_mmc7X19Ny…tachment-6.jpg

Zeiss Ultra Speeds is a great example of what is likely one of the most consistent lens sets in regards to physical build. Every lens between 16mm and 100mm is exactly 143mm in length, have a 93mm front diameter, and matching geared focus and iris ring positions. All lenses are consistent T-stop of T/1.9, and six focal lengths within the 24-85mm range have the exact same weight of 2.2 lbs.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-nNfeWMG5Z_…tachment-7.jpg

Zeiss ZE Canon lenses, a pretty nice photography lens set, is an example of how photography lenses are built for different types of use. Each lens is streamlined to be as small and light as possible, paying little attention to set uniformity. This particular lens set has different sized front diameters, different lengths, and dissimilar ungeared focus/iris ring placement.

When a lens is changed, the 1st AC will likely have to adjust the mattebox placement on the rails, exchange the bellows ring/back plate/doughnut, slightly adjust the follow focus, and require a greater re-balance on steadicam. This is not a big deal, as it’s simply more work for the AC, but it can cost time over the course of a day. If lens changes are often, this can add up quite quickly, especially in on bigger films.

If this wasn’t enough, many wonderful photography lenses no longer have an aperture ring! Manufacturers have moved the aperture ring from a physical and tactical ring on the lens to an electronic and internal function. For many lenses, the photographer must now use the camera to communicate with the lens and control the aperture electronically. On a cinema camera this immediately disqualifies the lens for use on most digital cinema cameras, as many do not have the means to communicate with a lens electronically. There are systems such as the Birger mount, which address some of these issues and does so quite well. If using internal aperture photography lenses on a cinema camera, this adapter seems to be the only sane option.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-stp9hVpbnx…8-usm-lens.jpg

Where is the aperture ring?!

Focus Barrel Rotation & Distance Witness Markings
A photographer does not need to worry about pulling focus smoothly or tracking a subject accurately at all times. A photographer must quickly find his subject and snap the photo. He can freely focus in front and behind the subject, narrowing in his focus. His hand is on the barrel and his eye through the lens. He cannot see the lens markings on the barrel, nor does he need to. He finds focus by eye and releases the shutter on an intuitive moment. The cinematographer cannot do this. Maybe if shooting docu-style, this can be a semi-acceptable method of focusing, but for all general purposes, one does not want to call attention to the camera, and focus hunting during a shot is an effective way of doing so. The cinematographer must accurately and discretely use focus to manipulate and direct the viewers eye. The camera assistant must follow the performances of the actor and/or the movement of the camera to keep the subject in focus. He cannot hunt for focus during a shot, and thus needs assistance from the lens in order to help him accurately track his target. This assistance comes in the form of many accurate witness markings on the barrel.

Photography lenses typically have short focus throws. One can go from close to infinity focus in a simple twist of the wrist. This is helpful when needing to focus quickly on a moments notice, as many field photographers do. However, short focus throws make it difficult to gently track a subject and increases the possibility of overshooting a target. The focus distance markings on a photography lens are often few in number, only generally accurate, and are without actual witness mark lines.

Modern cine lenses typically have a 300*+ barrel rotation. Cinema lenses are usually larger in size (for optical reasons) thus tend to have a long 300*+ rotation (300* rotation on a tiny lens can be less travel than a smaller rotation on a bigger girth lens). On high quality cinema lenses, each lens is custom engraved to ensure focus witness marks are as accurate as possible. Modern cinema lenses also have two focus scales, one for each side, so the camera assistant does not have to flip the lens in order to pull from the other side of the camera.

Build Materials
It can be argued whether photography or cinematography conditions are the hardest on equipment, (it’s cinematography btw) but there is little argument that cinema lenses are typically better built. Cinema lenses are built for the most rigorous of production demands. They are made from machined metal and are designed to operate from sub freezing temperatures to dangerously hot climates. They can be easily serviced, repaired, and modified. The most typical of cinema lens mounts, the PL and PV mount, are amongst the most strong, sturdy and temperature resistant designs.

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-GnSbeC3KDm…kes4primes.jpg

Cooke S4 lenses are made from machined anodized aluminum built to operate in conditions
from -13° to 131° fahrenheit. They are not threaded lens barrels, but instead use a cam system,
which eliminates the need for lubrication, such as grease.

Linear Iris in T-stops
Cinema lenses do not have ‘clicked’ iris rings like many photography lenses, thus one can set the aperture to land at any value between stops. Most modern PL lenses have linear iris rings, with every third of a stop marked. Because cinema lenses are in T-stops, achieving precise and matched exposures with different lenses is as easy as setting the iris ring. Photography lenses, often have clicked iris rings, meaning they must settle on one stop or another. Trying to split a stop will result in the lens likely trying to settle one way or another. If the photography lens does not have a clicked aperture, it will likely be rated in f/stops and without sub-stop markings.

T-stops Vs F-stops
Cinema lenses are rated in t-stops, ‘t’ for ‘transmission’, instead of the familiar f-stops found on photography lenses. T-stops are values which represent the true amount of light passing through the lens. Each lens is tested and marked for their T-stop values. An F-stop is simply a formula. It calculates the amount of light that should pass through a lens based on the focal length divided by the entrance pupil. Thus it’s decently accurate except for one thing… it does not take into account the light lost from passing through the glass elements inside the lens! Thus there is always a varying degree of light loss from one lens to another. With F-stop lenses you are always playing within a margin of error.

Matching Maximum Aperture & Iris Assembly
Cinema lens sets are designed and built to have matching maximum apertures. This feature isn’t as important as it is helpful, but if a lens set does not have matching maximum apertures, it is the responsibility of the cinematographer to work within the least common denominator among his lens set, or he will find himself switching to a lens that cannot support the working exposure he has already set with his lights. However, the iris assembly is different and arguably more important to the image. When shooting semi-stopped down, on a long lens, and with shallow depth of field, the shape of the iris aperture can be defined in the out of focus elements commonly referred to as lens bokeh. Lenses with matching iris assemblies will provide matching out of focus bokeh shapes. Cooke S4’s and Cooke Panchro/i’s use the same iris assembly design, thus if you were to use them together, they would not only be color matched, but would produce the exact same bokeh renderings at matched apertures. Having a lens set where one lens has a triangular iris assembly, another hexagonal, another octagonal, and another with 12 blades, will result in very different bokeh shapes. If consistency is the goal, this could prove problematic.

Lens Breathing
When one changes the focus of a lens, the optical elements inside shift in concert to bend the incoming light from the corresponding distance to a focal point upon the sensor. When the optical elements inside the lens reposition themselves during the focus rack, they can slightly alter the field of view of a lens, which will appear similar to a very slow and mild zoom. This is called lens breathing. In photography, breathing is not important what-so-ever. Besides changing the composition by arguably negligible amounts, breathing is not seen in the image. To eliminate breathing, the lens design must be changed to account for the optical effect, thus eliminating breathing is not a priority of photography lens manufacturers.

In cinema, tracking focus within a shot, or racking focus from one subject to another is a very common practice, thus cinema lenses take great strides to eliminate breathing. Not long ago, to eliminate breathing all together, Zeiss created a Dual-Floating Element design for their Master Primes. This design will be recognized at the 2012 Oscars with an Academy Award for Scientific and Technical Achievement.

Barrel Extension
As explained with lens breathing, when a lens changes focus or zooms, the optical elements inside adjust and shift. When designing lenses, it is often easier to allow the lens barrel to extend forward, in order to accommodate the shifting elements. Many photography lenses, when focused or zoomed, extend their barrel forward as the optical elements shift. Because cinema lenses have connected follow focus gears and a mattebox, telescoping lens barrels are not ideal, thus cinema lens designs provide for internal realignment. All shifting and repositioning of optical elements happen silently and unnoticeable inside of the lens housing. Everything remains as is.

Barrel telescoping can be from zooming or focusing. Typically barrel telescoping is worse from zooming, however poorly designed prime lenses can exhibit troublesome barrel telescoping when focusing a great distance across the barrel. Typically the issues arise when the lens pushes against the mattebox or the geared focus ring falls off the follow focus.

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5JGgdtfuhr…oom-Lenses.jpg

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-oKiTaaLm99…with-Hoods.jpg

Despite lens hoods being added, one can see the telescoping nature of some photography zooms.
(images from www.the-digital-picture.com)

Consistent focus and exposure throughout zoom range
Cinema zooms almost always carry exposure from one end of the zoom to the other. As an example, take the legendary Angenieux Optimo 12x zoom. It is a perfect T/2.8 from 24mm all the way to 290mm. Coupled with the other impressive optical and mechanical features of this lens, it’s no surprise the thing is the size of a military shell. There are many photography zooms which hold maximum exposure throughout the zoom range, but there are photography zooms which forsake this feature in order to accommodate lens design within a small/light housing and low price. Yuck.

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-cd6EevfFG7…cture%2B33.png

Angenieux 24-290mm T/2.8 Cine Zoom

Page Three: Mechanical Requirements
Conclusion
At the end of the day, a wonderful film can be made on photography lenses or cinema lenses. However, because these two mediums are very different in nature and thus the needs of photographers and cinematographers are very different, using photography lenses for cinema purposes is simply adding possible issues and concerns to an already full plate.

The same goes for using cinema lenses to take photographs. Using a Master Prime to take a photograph would be equally ridiculous. First of all, the lens is 8″ long and weighs about 5lbs. Additionally, handheld photography is not the same as handheld cinematography. One has the luxury of taking the weight on the shoulder… the other is all taken to the wrist. Now imagine having to carry several of these lenses around for a photo-journalism assignment. Not quite appropriate for the context of use. Focusing quickly would require multiple twists of the lens barrel, and likely lost time trying to reel in the focus, perhaps missing the spontaneous moment of the photo.

Thus, just as photography, there are types of videography that also may not benefit from cinema lenses. If shooting a documentary, wedding, or event videography that involves long hours of handheld shooting in spontaneous/unpredictable environments, perhaps a very lightweight photography zoom might be a more appropriate tool despite some shortcomings.

The design points described in this writing are the ideal design points of a modern day cinema lens set. However, not all cinema lens sets contain all of these attributes. Vintage cinema lenses and new lower cost cinema lens sets do not attain all of the above. Just as that is true, the same goes for photography lenses. There are photography lens exceptions to where some lenses exhibit attributes of cinema lenses. For instance, Zeiss ZM’s have f/stop markings for 1/3 stops on the barrel.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-FR-HuLJH8j…0/zm15-pic.jpg

Zeiss 15mm f/2.8 ZM (Leica Mount) with 1/3 stop mapped f/stop scale

Shoot a film with the best optics available to the production. Learn the strengths and weaknesses of that lens set and go about doing what is necessary to utilize those strengths and minimize the weaknesses. Cinema lenses simply allow for less weaknesses and more strengths, leaving the burdened mind of the cinematographer to other things. It’s a luxury well worth having.