Books to Read

I would start with a writer whose beautiful and supple prose influenced me as a child and continues to influence me as an adult writer: Ray Bradbury. Pick up any of his short story collections (TheMartian Chronicles, The Illustrated Man, etc.) and savor his sentences. I think you will find him less daunting than some of the more classical masters of prose. After Bradbury, move on to C. S. Lewis. His sentences tend to be shorter but no less rhetorically effective. Start with Screwtape Letters and Mere Christianity. G. K. Chesterton is another prose stylist, whose sentences are a bit more complicated than those of Lewis. I’d suggest Orthodoxy and The Everlasting Man.

I’d suggest you then move on to some of the great Victorian prose stylists. Try Newman’sIdea of the University, John Ruskin’s The Stones of Venice, and Matthew Arnold’s Culture and Anarchy. Then treat yourself to Dickens’s A Christmas Carol; read it slowly and savor the prose. If you want a taste of American prose, try Emerson’s Essays or Thoreau’s Walden.

Finally, challenge yourself with the Sermons or the Devotions upon Emergent Occasions by John Donne. Donne is a master of baroque prose, and his sentences are truly works of art. Along with Donne, try Milton’s “Areopagitica” and Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress. When you are finished, perhaps pick up a novel by Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls or The Sun Also Rises) to experience a very different, deceptively simple prose style.